Quintessence

This week I’m trying something I have not succeeded at yet. I’m going to really, truly keep this one short and sweet.

Back in the days of “I”, I wrote about ichor, which the poet Homer stated was the blue ethereal fluid that flowed through the veins of the gods. Now I get a chance to revisit that concept with quintessence.

To the Romans, quinta essentia was thought to be blue blood, the spirit of immorality, or the essential “fifth of man”. It could be a sacred wine or ambrosia, or it could be the menstrual blood of the goddess. During the honey-moon, Aphroditie’s worshippers believed that the essential fifth came to man, and lasted the length of a menstrual period.

During medieval times alchemists thought quinta essentia to be a blue elixir. This elixir had the power to to provide spiritual illumination and resurrection.

Aristotle believed that quintessence was a fifth element. This element was thought by some to be the same as ether, which is the fluid of heaven.

Some cultures actually have blue gods, or at least gods depicted as being blue in sacred art. Many Hindu gods are blue, and if you go way back into the collective subconscious Indo-European gods were immortal due to their blue blood. This ancient belief may play a role in why some early British tribes painted themselves blue before certain religious ceremonies and going to battle. The Gnostics also taught that the blue-blooded god was filled with quintessence.

For some reason or another this notion of quinta essentia, or quintessence, is really interesting to me. In my mind it only makes since that the gods would have special blood. And of course man is going to try and get some of that blood, or at least come up with their best representations.

And check that out. I did indeed manage to keep this one short and sweet. Sweet that is, if you like the notion of blue gods blood.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Jack
    Aug 26, 2012 @ 17:45:22

    Haha, I see you took this in a totally different direction than I did! It was interesting to read over, though.

    Reply

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